Do(ing) it Like a Feminist

Post-Grad Girl living in a Post-Grad World.


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Moving Past the Funk: Living in a Post-Election World

Like many people, I’ve been in mourning. I actually found myself googling how to immigrate to Canada the night of the Election. Granted, I didn’t make it past the screen showing that the site crashed, but I still wondered how I would be able to do it. Then I thought more about what a Trump Presidency would look like and wondered, what would it look like for me to abandon my place in this country and lose my will to fight? If I were a child, I wouldn’t want my elders to do that to me, so I can’t give up now.

To this day, I can not fathom how people could vote for Trump. You say he is anti-establishment; we say he is a racist demagogue. You say he is a great businessman; we say he has gone bankrupt a handful of times and has only looked out for himself. I can go on and on about this, but there is no point. The only points left to make are what is going to happen next. How can we teach our peers and young folk about what it means to be an advocate for the issues at hand?

And here is where you can get your crash course.

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Harro, page 16

In Bobbie Harro’s “The Cycle of Socialization”, she discusses how we are socialized from birth/toddler into a way of thinking. We are taught biases and stereotypes, and we live with these mechanics as we grow up. We are then socialized on a personal level from parents, loved ones, and teachers (that’s why they are so important). These mechanics are then reinforced through various institutions such as church, TV, and in our culture. When these mechanics are reinforced, they result in anger, discrimination, and ignorance. It’s up to you to figure out which direction you want to go- do you want to continue reinforcing the same cycle, or would you want to head in a direction for change?

For those who says white privilege doesn’t exist, I want you to look at the events that have occurred since the election: swastikas being spray-painted on walls, a woman in Brooklyn was punched by a male trump supporter at a restaurant in Brooklyn, a woman pulled another woman’s hijab off in a Walmart in the name of Trump, and the list goes on and on. In Peggy McIntosh’s “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack”, she states:

“My culture gives me little fear about ignoring the perspectives and powers of people of other races.” (McIntosh, 2)

As a woman of color, I will never be able to have this privilege. From what I’ve observed about the country post-Election is that many people who have this privilege don’t (or won’t) understand the power their actions have with people of color, and they don’t worry about the consequences of their actions, because most likely, they won’t be reprimanded for it. Is this what we want to teach our future children and voters?

For all you Trump supporters, I hope you realize what your future will look like. Only a week has passed and there is already a white supremacist in a position of power. You did this. Take responsibility for it. Once Donald Trump takes his place in the White House, I can only predict the decline of our Country, economically and socially. You can sit back and say that he will fix our broken “system”, but he will continue to display divisive and demeaning behavior toward people of color, the LGBTQIA community, Muslims, immigrants, etc..

Or maybe that’s what you all really want, which is much scarier to think about.

For those of you who are willing to fight forward, find your local community programs. Volunteer. Protest. Write to your local politicians. We will not be swayed. I am with you all.

___________________________

Harro, Bobbie. “The Cycle of Socialzation.” Readings for Diversity and Social Justice. N.p.: Routledge, 2007. 15-21. Print.

McIntosh, Peggy. “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.” N.p., n.d. Web. 15 Nov. 2016.


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Having an Open & Intellectual Conversation with Your Partner/ A Mini-Lesson on Privilege & Oppression

Bloggers,

Last night, Marcus and I had an extremely interesting conversation that spanned over dinner, before and after a movie, and during a quick trip to Dunkin Donuts. Here’s where it started: while we were sitting in Red Lobster, I noticed that I didn’t see any female waiters and I made a comment about it. Marcus told me that I was being “racist” (wrong word) and before I face palmed myself, I told him that he meant sexist. We then proceeded a conversation about sexism and racism and how they weren’t the same thing. I explained that I wasn’t implying that there should be only women working there, but there should be an EQUAL amount of all genders because that’s how it should be. This led into a conversation about children and his double standard of boys and girls.

Granted, I could have just gotten up and walked away to go to the bathroom or just changed the subject, but these are the types of conversations that need to be created to understand both sides of the relationship. When I decide to have kids, it doesn’t matter whether they are a boy or a girl, they will be treated the same way. If I treat them a certain way according to society’s standards, then the cycle of socialization will continue amongst my children. Marcus felt a different way about raising his children, but after reaching a stalemate (or rather our food came), the conversation stopped and was left alone. Later that evening, we started talking about the impending ratification of Puerto Rico as the 51st state, and to my surprise, we held the same ideals. Then, he made a comment about Latin American’s emulating their culture off of black culture, and I couldn’t just let that go. I started talking to him about urbanization and how we’re socialized according to the environment we surround ourselves with. There was something so genuine about this conversation because although in my heart I knew he was serious about these ideas, I was afforded the opportunity to educate him about these types of subjects.

Now, when it comes to relationships, is it OK to keep the politics out of it, or engage them and create conversations? With that question, I answer by saying that the personal is political, and everything we do, experience, etc. has a political connotation. We can’t pretend like our society isn’t dealing with social issues and economic crisis, so conversations need to happen. Who knows, maybe both sides can learn something and take it to someone else, then the dialogue is really expanding. As a female who understands the simultinaety of privilege and oppression, it is pertinent to retain knowledge about these different types of politics.

According to the SCWAMP theory, it is said that if you fall under SCWAMP, then you are of the privileged few. What is SCWAMP? It is an acronym: Straight, Christian, White, Able-Bodied, Male with Property (meaning social class), and if you fit into this mold, then you are privileged and considered the dominant force in this society. However, many do not fall under this system; many feel oppression from single or multiple identities. As a Puerto Rican woman with no property, I understand the oppression of my race, class, and gender, but I recognize my privilege in my religion, accessibility, and sexuality. It is with the simultinaety of my privilege and oppression that I am able to understand the concept of how I’ve been socialized in my environment, but it is my duty to break free from the cycle and educate others about it, and what better way to start then with your partner.

Granted, this post switched into a personal rant, but as I said before, the personal is political. Stay true to yourself and expand the conversation. After all, it’s the most simple form of activism.


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Life is All About Rhetorical Choices

Bloggers! Today was an exciting day for feminism and community!

Don’t you just love graffiti art?

My friend Connie came to visit me this past weekend (also known as my birthday weekend) and we have been having great feminist conversations since her arrival! Considering we are social justice sisters, it is fitting that once we get reconnected, we start devising plans of world domination (or what flavor cupcake we want to try). Today, we met up with my friend Carrie for some Brooklyn fun, which may or may not have included cupcakes, feminist lit, and tattoos.

Yes, you read correctly – TATTOOS. Everything about this was a rhetorical choice, based on a previous situation that left three people tattooed with the word “choice” in various fonts a couple months ago. Even when I got my first tattoo (FTB – F**k the Binaries), it was based on a rhetorical choice, as all tattoos should be considering it’s permanent. As usual, my thought process behind today’s tattoo was spontaneous even though Connie was dead set on getting it for weeks. She decided on getting “womynist” with the O replaced by a venus symbol (aka the female symbol for those who don’t know). I had to sketch the idea for the tattoo artist, and this is the best I could do in a short time:

Check out my hand drawn font! Yes, that is helvetica.

This tattoo is both a personal and rhetorical choice, because as you all know, the personal is political (as usual). After talking with the tattoo artist and my fellow fontist Carrie, we decided to go with the Franklin Gothic Demi Condensed font in size 36 (Michele you would be so proud). And because you are all anxious for the finished product, here it is:

JUST KIDDING! If you don’t know where this is from, you need to get out more. Here it really is:

This is some rhetorical shiznet

Aside from the tattoo being at a steal of a price, it was also a great to finally get a tattoo with my social justice PIC (never mind the awesome look on Carrie’s face when I made a split decision to get it as well).

For me, tattoos are meant to be rhetorical, but personal. This is a representation of the person I am due to feminism and activism. If you are going to permanently ink your body, it should have a higher meaning than the average “it would just look cool” thought.

Next up: I found a signature of my mother’s and I’m going to have a tattoo artist scan and enlarge it for my next tattoo project. Here’s to the next rhetorical choice!